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Guide to Grammar (WIP)
#1
This guide was originally written by Karl_Salameh, from this thread. His username here is Karl89, and permission has been received to repost the guide here.
Thanks to Kialee for originally finding it and sharing it with us.
There's more to follow, both in updates and additional posts by others later in the thread, and feel free to offer feedback and additional comments!





To, too, and two.

To
"In the direction of." Example; I am going to school.
"Sign of the infinitive case." Example; I want to go to school.
-
Too
"To a degree exceeding normal or proper limits." Example; You are too stupid.
"In addition." Example; I would like some french fries, and a cheeseburger too.
-
Two
"Being one more than one." Example; I received two messages.
"2."
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___________________________________________________________________________

Then and than.

Then
"Subsequently or soon afterward." Example; Go left and then right.
"In that case or as a consequence." Example; If he didn't take it, then who did?
"At that time." Example; I was young then.
-
Than
"Conjunction used in comparatives." Example; Amanda is taller than me.
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Your and you're.

Your
"Of you or yourself." Example; Could you hand me your pen for a second?
-
You're
"You are." Example; I think you're (you are) quite handsome today, sir.
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Their, they're and there.

Their
"Of them or themselves." Example; Their house is huge!
"His or her." Example; Someone hit their head.
-
They're
"They are." Example; I think they're (they are) quite an annoying group of people.
-
There
"In or at that place." Example; John has lived there for many years.
"In that matter." Example; I agree with you there.

___________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________

He/she and his/hers.

His/hers
"Property of him/her." Example: His class starts in 5 minutes.
-
He's/she's
"He/she is." Example: He's going to class in 5 minutes.

___________________________________________________________________________
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We're and where.

Where
"Referring to a location." Example: Where are you going?
-
We're
"We are." Example: We're (we are) going to the store.

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I/I've/I'm

The 'I' in all of these words should be capitalized, as they are referring to one's self.

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___________________________________________________________________________

Singular and plural forms of words ending with '-fe':
When changing a word ending in '-fe', drop the '-fe' and add '-ves'.

Example; 'knife' becomes 'knives'.

-

Singular and plural forms of words ending in '-y':
When changing the tense of a word ending in '-y', drop the '-y' and add '-ies'.

Example; 'baby' becomes 'babies'.
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#2
Quote:His/hers
"Property of him/her." Example: His class starts in 5 minutes.

Missed the "s" after "hers."

Looks good so far! If we're going in depth, I'd definitely suggest making headings for the three most common errors I tend to see in people's writing...namingly: dialogue writing, capitalization, and punctuation. Unfortunately, these three topics are so expansive that you could probably write an article on each individually.
Have you hugged an orc today?
- I am not tech support. Please do not contact me regarding technical issues. -
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#3
I did? Whoops.
Glad you pointed it out, anyway.

Well, I'd say we need an article on each of those topics, really.
I have nothing but free time. I'll see what I can do.
[Image: kialee.png]
I need a life.
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#4
Heh, you could call this thread "What Sersay fails at" too. ^^;
"Do not judge, and you will not be judged. Do not condemn, and you will not be condemned. Forgive, and you will be forgiven."
-Take nothing for granted. -
[Image: tumblr_m3fonvvR601qktztio3_250.gif]
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#5
I'll add in one that's simply a case of using the wrong word, but it's really common.

Silently and quietly.

Silently
"Without any sound." Example; As speaking was forbidden in detention, he had to curse his dog silently.
-
Quietly
"With minimal sound." Example; The librarian was in a bad mood, so we even had to whisper quietly.


Keep in mind that anything that, by definition, makes sound... cannot be done silently. You cannot sing or speak silently (but you can mouth the words without speaking them), you cannot hum silently, sneeze silently, etc. Laughing silently can be done, but anyone who's done it knows that it's still fairly obvious you're laughing.
[Image: Q1-1.png]

"We are here on earth to fart around, and don't let anybody tell you different."
~Kurt Vonnegut
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#6
Hm. What about past tense and present tense consistency? This area's overlooked a lot. It can be pretty vital when reading a person's actions.

"She brushed her hair while she listened to his speech."
"She brushes her hair while listening to his speech."

This doesn't look like much because of the short examples, but it can be glaringly obvious when you're posting long emotes, especially in action sequences.
˜★Sketch Blog
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#7
Here's the next section: Punctuation!



Punctuation Guide
________________________________________________________

To understand what kind of punctuation marks you have to use in any particular sentence, it's helpful to understand the four types of sentences:
1) Declarative
2) Interrogative
3) Imperative
4) Exclamatory

Declarative sentences are used to form a statement or convey an idea, and end with a period.

Examples:

I have a cat.
That car is fast.
His hair looks nice.
We've forgotten the milk.

Interrogative sentences are used to ask a question, and therefore end with a question mark.

Examples:

How are you feeling today?
Are you certain?

Imperative sentences are used to make a command or request, and can end with a period or exclamation point.

Examples:

Go to the store for me.
Find out his name!

Exclamatory sentences have powerful feelings attached to them, and always end with an exclamation point.

Examples:

That house is on fire!
I can't believe you cheated on me!
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Commas

Commas are a tricky subject sometimes, but it can be boiled down to three simple rules, if you're not going to be too terribly picky about their usage.

1) Between items in a series.
When you have a list containing many items or choices, a comma is required. However, this rule often trips people up.
You only need commas if a list contains three or more items.

Example/Comparison:

I went to the store and bought milk and eggs.
I went to the store and bought milk, butter, and eggs.

2) Between two sentences.

If you connect two sentences with a conjunction (and, if, but, or, etc.) a comma is used.

Example:

I ran through their backyard, then jumped over the fence.

3) Adding information to the front or back of sentences.

Instead of listing the seven or eight rules stating what each piece is and how to add it, I'll condense it down to one rule of thumb: When attaching anything to the front or back of a sentence, use a comma.

Examples:

Certainly, you may borrow my car.
To preserve our profits, we sold shares of the company at low prices.

_______________________________________________________

Apostrophes

1) To form a contraction.

Cannot -> Can't
Will not -> Won't
Do not -> Don't
We are -> We're
We will -> We'll
It is -> It's
You are -> You're
I am -> I'm

2) To form possessives.

John's bike
Dave's cat
Elissa's mother

An apostrophe before the 's' designates the item belongs to the person.
If the object is owned by more than one person, the apostrophe goes after the 's'.

Examples:

Students' books
Cats' whiskers

When a word already ends with 's' and is a singular possessive, the apostrophe can come after the 's', or you can add an apostrophe and an 's'.

Example:

James' or James's

Some will argue that the second 's' is redundant, but both are technically correct.
For best results, simply add the apostrophe after the 's'.

3) To make letters and numbers plural.

Examples:

On my last report card, I made three A's and four B's.
His latest test scores were two 99's and three 100's.
[Image: Q1-1.png]

"We are here on earth to fart around, and don't let anybody tell you different."
~Kurt Vonnegut
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#8
A little note on the punctuation section: I only hit the main portions to keep down the length. If anyone feels like doing sections on quotation marks, semicolons/colons, dashes, parenthesis, or any other odd marks I don't know of, knock yourselves out.
[Image: kialee.png]
I need a life.
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#9
Firstly, this is awesome! Can I rip it off to bring to uni and show my peers? I swear, 90% of them wouldn't know a question mark if it bit them on the bum. I'm a preservice high school teacher, and 90% of my cohort have trouble with even basic SPAG. The other 10% come from overseas and have excellent written English...

Secondly, can I make a note about apostrophes?

Please, please, please, do NOT use apostrophes to make plurals!! The club is open three nights a week, not three night's a week.

The store sells apples, not apple's.

And so on.
酒なくて
何の己が
桜かな


Without sake
What is the use of
Cherry blossoms?
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#10
Wow. -Great- job Kialee! I think I'm going two write one to!
This is definitely going to help people with grammar problems. :D
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#11
Lucheiah Wrote:Firstly, this is awesome! Can I rip it off to bring to uni and show my peers? I swear, 90% of them wouldn't know a question mark if it bit them on the bum. I'm a preservice high school teacher, and 90% of my cohort have trouble with even basic SPAG. The other 10% come from overseas and have excellent written English...

Heh, if you feel the need, I won't stop you.
Just give credit where credit is due and I won't have to send in the hitman.

On that note, I have to update this thing sometime.
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#12
*Sends a hitman after Kialee!*

http://forum.ls-rp.com/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=10749
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#13
*blink* That... is no good.
I Am the Sea



Need an easy way to host/link files and images? Check this thread!

Try to never just say, "My character isn't interested in that adventure." A lot of people mistake this for good roleplaying, because you are asserting your character's personality. Wrong. Good roleplaying should never bring the game to a screeching halt. One of your jobs as a player is to come up with a reason why your character would be interested in a plot. After all, your personality is entirely in your hands, not the DM's. Come up with a reason why the adventure (or the reward) might appeal to you, no matter how esoteric or roundabout the reasoning. -(Source)
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#14
Lucheiah Wrote:Firstly, this is awesome! Can I rip it off to bring to uni and show my peers? I swear, 90% of them wouldn't know a question mark if it bit them on the bum. I'm a preservice high school teacher, and 90% of my cohort have trouble with even basic SPAG. The other 10% come from overseas and have excellent written English...

Secondly, can I make a note about apostrophes?

Please, please, please, do NOT use apostrophes to make plurals!! The club is open three nights a week, not three night's a week.

The store sells apples, not apple's.

And so on.

Good post, and good point. Might I add the following? =)

Qaza Wrote:2) To form possessives.

John's bike
Dave's cat
Elissa's mother

An apostrophe before the 's' designates the item belongs to the person.
If the object is owned by more than one person, the apostrophe goes after the 's'.

Examples:

Students' books
Cats' whiskers

When a word already ends with 's' and is a singular possessive, the apostrophe can come after the 's', or you can add an apostrophe and an 's'.

Example:

James' or James's

Some will argue that the second 's' is redundant, but both are technically correct.
For best results, simply add the apostrophe after the 's'.

3) To make letters and numbers plural.

Examples:

On my last report card, I made three A's and four B's.
His latest test scores were two 99's and three 100's.

Quote:The club is open three nights a week, but the club owners' parking lot is filled just before the doors are unlocked, so leave early.

The above indicates that the club has more than one owner. Placement of the apostrophe is obviously very important.

You can use apostrophes in a possessive case, as well as to modify the word to show 1) more than one with numbers and letters 2) abbreviations, just as Qaza outlined.

If Jon has more than one brother, and you wish to make mention of it by using the word brothers in a sentence, you would write as:
Quote:Jon's brothers' cars...
not
Quote:Jon's brother's cars
because
Quote:Jon's brother's cars
though the word cars is plural (note there is no apostrophe attached to cars, indicating the possessive case, in other words, the cars are not Christine and own Jon's brothers), it is not possessive the following
Quote:Jon's brother's cars
indicates Jon only has one brother, and more than one car. See where the apostrophe is in the word brothers?
I recommend the reference Little, Brown Handbook for anyone seeking confirmation of the above, and also as an excellent collegiate textbook for grammar when that term paper comes due. :wink:

A place where people care about grammar! It makes me want to cry tears of joy. :shock: I feel like parodying Fuckaire, "Correct me!" lol...
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#15
Kretol Wrote:*blink* That... is no good.

I don't mind. :P

You have permission, yada yada..

If it was someone else than Kialee though, I might have gotten frisky. :P

Didn't know Kialee plays here actually. She just told me she plays WoW online on RP servers, so I installed WoW and the first RP server I found was here, so I registered. :P Oh how the World (wide web) is small. LOL
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